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Consumers Still Hurting Despite Loan and Card Reforms

It is still possible to get credit today even if you’re in a terrible financial mess. However, be prepared to shoulder the cost of it. Despite sweeping reforms in the credit card law that are designed to stop banks from plunging borrowers deeper in debt, banks are still lending with devastating terms.

Consider the interest rate charged on some subprime credit cards: 59.9 percent. This is unfair and unrealistic whichever way you look at it. There are also an array of cards and loans available from prepaid cards to payday loans, which comes with a very high rate.

Bank’s Point of View

Financial institutions reason that the high interest rates and fees they charge are prerequisites of the business. This is because they are taking the risk that borrowers will default on the loan. They reason out that putting a cap on their interest rate will put them out of business. And even put consumers who need money most with no recourse than to rely on public services.

Nevertheless, President Obama and advocacy groups want better consumer protection. The President is pushing for a consumer protection agency that will oversee how financial products are handled. Right now though, its future is uncertain and negotiations are still underway for a more sweeping reform.

Worse Options?

Kathleen Day from the Center of Responsible Lending said that, “It’s in nobody’s interest to lend people money they can’t afford to repay.” That’s probably why about a quarter of households are not associated with any bank. Even if they are, many rely on alternative services such as payday loans, prepaid cards, or subprime credit cards.

As opposed to McDonald’s 14,000 branches, there are about 22,000 payday loan branches around the United States. This presence highlights the fact that many consumers are in a pinch. Around 19 million people took advantage of their services last year because it is a quick way to get cash. Basically, you just need to give the lender a postdated check of the loan amount plus the fee. Payday lenders usually ask for $15 or more for $100 borrowed.

On the surface, it is easy to understand the fee. But when you look closely, the average fee on the $100 loan translates to an interest of 391 percent in an annualized rate. While some states have banned payday lending, others worry that this may choke off an important source of money for cash-strapped individuals.

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